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Handouts & questionnaires for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - first post

PLEASE NOTE: This blog post dates back to December 2008.  All the questionnaires on this page, updated scoring details for the IES-R, the widely used Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory, descriptions of how to do "reliving" of the trauma, written accounts, and site visits, as well as a series of other updated PTSD-relevant questionnaires and handouts are available on the relevant "Good knowledge" page of this website - "PTSD assessment, images, memories & assessment".  Also of relevance (particularly for child abuse) is the page "Life review, traumatic memories & therapeutic writing".

Handouts & questionnaires for health anxiety disorder

Here are the two main questionnaires currently used to assess Health Anxiety Disorder - the HAI and the HAQ.  The HAI is the one recommended by the NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative.  I've also added a scale put together by Adrian Wells that assesses safety behaviours and extent of disease belief.  Finally there is a classic CBT thoughts record.  I don't use these kinds of records much any more, but I've added it for 'completeness'.

Health anxiety inventory (HAI) - the 18 item (short form) HAI is the disorder specific scale recommended by the IAPT initiative.  The third page of the download gives typical scores for a Health Anxiety group, a more general anxiety group, a control group, and so on.   

Health anxiety questionnaire (HAQ) - this 21 item health anxiety questionnaire yields four subscales, which can make it easier therapeutically to target specific behaviours like reassurance seeking.  The third page of the download gives some idea of likely scores in different disorders.

Pain assessment & information

“ No man was ever wise by chance. ” - Lucius Seneca

For many years my work split fairly evenly between helping people with psychological difficulties and helping people with pain problems.  Quite a few people were troubled with both.  In the last several years I have done much less work with pain, although I still see some people for overall pain management.  This has been partly because I was trying to keep up-to-date with too many fields, so stepping back from pain work made sense.  It has also been partly because the flourishing of research into happiness & wellbeing has fascinated me and taken up time.  Here are a collection of pain-associated assessment and information sheets that I accumulated over the years.  They are obviously relevant for work with pain, and some (e.g. one year symptom diary) can be adapted for work with stress & psychological difficulties. 

Alcohol & food

“ There are no paths, paths are made by walking. ” - Australian Aboriginal saying

Here are a series of information and assessment handouts on alcohol and food.  "We are what we eat" is bit over-simplified, but only a bit.  It's amazing how important what we eat and drink is for our psychological and physical health.  This site's blog posts  "New research shows diet's importance for preventing depression" and "Preventing cancer through life style choices" make this point well and also provide links with many other sources of information.  Searching the tag cloud brings up much recent relevant research and advice.  Try clicking, for example, on

Emotions, feelings & personality

“ If you want others to be happy, practise compassion. If you want to be happy, practise compassion. ” - The 14th Dalai Lama

This section contains handouts and questionnaires about emotions, feelings & personality.  It seems helpful to understand emotions through an evolutionary perspective - we have emotions, to a large extent, because they had (and have) survival value.  We are the descendants of people with adaptive emotional systems that helped them stay alive and function well.  Typically unwelcome feelings that seem maladaptive are due to emotions that are firing off inappropriately.  As a rule of thumb, if an emotion is an appropriate reaction to a situation it can help us respond successfully.  If the emotion is inappropriate then it's likely to be more useful to work to change the emotional response - through therapy or other approaches. 

Relationships, families, couples & psychosexual

“ Tell me what company you keep, and I'll tell you what you are. ” - Don Quixote/Miguel De Cervantes

Here are a series of questionnaires and handouts on couples, sexuality, parenting, attachment, and abuse.  The first sequence of 20 or so handouts are from a two day workshop I run - for more details including downloadable copies of the slides, see the blog post "Psychotherapy with couples & other close relationships".  Listed below these are further relevant handouts & questionnaires.

Depression, CBASP & neuroscience

“ Hope is the dream of a soul awake. ” - French proverb

Here is a mixed bag of handouts and questionnaires.  Most are spin-offs from CBASP (pronounced 'seebasp') - the awkwardly named cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy.  There are also a few handouts which are adapted downloads from the neurosciences site "The brain from top to bottom".   When in 2000, Keller et al reported on the very impressive results obtained by treating chronic depression with a mixture of CBASP and antidepressants, it seemed likely that a big step forward had been taken in improving the lot of chronic depression sufferers.  The "CBASP research results" handout (below) gives the abstracts for 14 research papers that are both relevant to CBASP and also highlight other important related themes like th

Depression assessment

Beware the barrenness of a busy life.

- Anon

Depression assessment scales come in two basic forms - interviewer/clinician rated and sufferer/patient rated.  As stated in the background information on the IDS/QIDS questionnaires (see below) "There are several accepted clinician rated and patient self report measures of depressive symptoms. The most commonly used clinician rated scales are the 17, 21, 24, 28, and 31 item versions of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) (Hamilton 1960, 1967), and the 10-item Montgomery-Asberg Scale (Montgomery and Asberg 1979). The most frequently used self-reports include the 13, and 21 item version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) (Beck et al. 1961), the BDI-II (Beck et al. 1996), the Zung Depression Rating Scale (Zung 1965), the Carroll Rating Scale (CRS) (Carroll et al. 1981), and the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) (Kroenke et al.

Depression information

“ It is possible that the entire healing relationship is actually founded on friendship. ” - Saki Santorelli

Here are a few handouts that I've put together over the years to provide background information about depression.  The development/maintenance diagram is probably the handout here that I use most - both to explain issues about depression and also for many other psychological disorders as well. 

Introduction & monitoring

“ The flow of energy through a system serves to organize that system. ” - R. Buckminster Fuller

Here are a series of forms that I use almost every session with clients, or for screening and orientation at the start of therapy:

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