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"To reach the other shore with each step of the crossing": linking this with embodied cognition (2nd post)

(This post & the previous one in the series are downloadable combined into a Word doc or a PDF file)

"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands but in seeing with new eyes."   Proust

"Let the beauty we love be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground."    Rumi

"Wisdom, compassion, and courage are the three universally recognized moral qualities of men."   Confucius

"To reach the other shore with each step of the crossing": zazen, associative thinking & value-driven behaviour (1st post)

     (This post & the next in the series are downloadable combined into a Word doc or a PDF file)

"But the future is the future, the past is the past; now we should work on something new."    Shunryu Suzuki

In 1970 I started to learn meditation with the Cambridge Buddhist Society.  It was the year that Shunryu Suzuki's great book "Zen mind, beginner's mind" was published.  I was deeply intrigued.  So much of his writing was challenging:

Leeds BABCP conference: Kelly Wells ACT plenary and a skills class on imagery for sport, exercise & life (7th post)

I have already written four blog posts about the pre-conference workshop I attended (on Fatigue) and a couple of posts on the conference proper - "Two symposia on how CBT works, Paul Salkovskis's plenary and the compassion special interest group" and "Therapeutic stories & metaphors".  Today's post looks further at the second day of this annual BABCP get-together with comments on Kelly Wells's plenary lecture on Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Jennifer Cumming on application of imagery for athletes and exercisers.

Fear of blushing is more a problem of hyperawareness than of facial temperature

(This & next week's social anxiety blog posts are available as a PDF file or a Word doc - you may need to 'save' the latter before you can open it)

"At bottom every man knows well enough that he is a unique being, only once on this earth; and by no extraordinary chance will such a marvelously picturesque piece of diversity in unity as he is, ever be put together a second time."         Frederich Nietzsche

Six recent research papers on mindfulness: outcome reviews, brain changes, self-compassion, current depression, and overview

Here are half a dozen interesting recent papers on mindfulness that have caught my eye.  Mindfulness research is roaring ahead a bit like a runaway train (probably not an ideal analogy for this subject matter), so it's good to get regular reviews of where we're getting to.  The first two papers I mention are "a synthesis of the empirically supported advantages of mindfulness" by Davis & Haye, including "research on therapists who meditate and client outcomes of therapists who meditate", and a review of "the empirical literature on the effects of mindfulness on psychological health" by Keng & colleagues (full details and links to all articles mentioned are given further down this blog post). 

The 'bus driver' is warm-blooded: integrating mindfulness & emotion 2

I wrote yesterday about a couple of 'notes of caution' when using mindfulness approaches and the "The bus driver metaphor".  I pointed out that many primary emotions & constructive thoughts help energise and direct us towards healthy goals.  I also mentioned the importance of integrating head & heart in mindfulness practice.  In today's post I want to extend the head/heart integration to include 'gut' as well, and also talk a little about the importance of sometimes using 'emotional processing' methods with some of our most persistently troublesome 'freeloader bus passenger' inner voices.

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