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Erectile dysfunction (and other sexual difficulties) are common, distressing and treatable

A couple of recent research papers caught my attention - Kashdan & colleagues' "Sexuality leads to boosts in mood and meaning in life with no evidence for the reverse direction: A daily diary investigation" and Gerbild et al's "Physical activity to Improve erectile function: A systematic review of intervention studies".  The two papers are a good reminder of how sex can often be an important contributor to wellbeing, that sexual difficulties are common, and that much can be done to help this kind of problem. 

The surprising power of weak 'social ties'

I’ve just been to the Farmer’s Market here in Edinburgh and I set myself the challenge of being more chatty than usual to the stallholders I was buying food from.  I ‘pushed’ myself to be friendly & talk more than I’ve ever done before (and I’ve been going to the market intermittently for years) … and it was such fun.  Tender, bubbly, jokey, light.  And I had more of a spring in my step for hours afterwards.  And it didn’t mean that I took much longer doing the shopping than I usually do either.  And as one might have predicted, this ‘good mood’ and happy positivity then splashed over into my actions subsequently (see Barbara Fredrickson's 'Broaden-and-build theory' of the function of positive emotions and her comments about

Compassion, wisdom & wellbeing training: 8th session, taking the learning on into our lives

At our eighth & last session of the Compassion, wisdom & wellbeing trainingwe reviewed the journey we've been on together over the last couple of months.  We looked at what each of us personally had found most interesting & valuable.  The weekly reflection sheets that we'd filled in could make it easier to remember the variety of areas we've explored.

Social networks: social identity & the importance of both formal & informal group memberships (what can we do?)

“ Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. ” - Thomas Edison

   Social networks: social identity & the importance of both formal & informal groups (what can we do?)

 

key points: 

 

1.)  emerging research is introduced that highlights the great importance of personal social networks for disease prevention, psychological resilience & optimal wellbeing. 

 

Social networks: Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 model (assessing how we're doing)

The data is friendly.

- Anon

                       Social networks: Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 model (assessing how we're doing)

key points: 

 

1.)  Please would you download a personal community map (see below) and begin to fill it in. 

 

2.)  While filling in the map and afterwards, answer the items on the associated questionnaire ... and start to jot down possible intentions too.

 

Social networks: Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 model (support clique/closest relationships)

“ Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity, but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men for they may act their dream with open eyes to make it possible. ” - T. E. Lawrence

                         Social networks: Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 model (support clique/closest relationships)

key point: 

 

In this first part of three on Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 personal social network model, I introduce the crucially important inner layer - the 'support clique' of closest relationships.

 

Social networks: social identity & the importance of both formal & informal group memberships (background)

The brains of human beings seem built to process stories better than other forms of input ...  

- Thomas B Newman, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics

Social networks: social identity & the importance of both formal & informal group memberships (background)

 

key point: 

 

The intriguing additional value of understanding social networks through a social identity lens is highlighted and a wealth of emerging research validating the importance of this approach is introduced.

 

Social networks: an introduction

“ Honest criticism is hard to take, particularly from a relative, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger. ” - Franklin Jones

                                                                Social networks: an introduction

 

key points: 

 

1.)  emerging research is introduced that highlights the great importance of personal social networks for disease prevention, psychological resilience & optimal wellbeing. 

 

2.)  links are provided to three ways of taking this forward - self-determination theory, social identity theory, and Dunbar's 5-15-50-150 model.

 

Social networks: the value of a self-determination theory lens

“ The eye altering, alters all. ” - William Blake

                                          Social networks: the value of a self-determination theory lens

key points: 

 

1.)  I introduce self-determination theory (S-DT) - a serious contender for my favourite approach to understanding how best to build wellbeing

 

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